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Amsterdam Live Concerts 1953

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Amsterdam Live Concerts 1953

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Amsterdam Live Concerts 1953

Think of Big Bill Broonzy as Leadbelly with sharper teeth. Like the seminal Texas strummer, Broonzy worked in the songster tradition, using guitar purely as accompaniment to his storytelling rather than a means of virtuosic expression. But Broonzy's political lyrics--especially the famed color-line ...
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From R973.00 at 1 Shops
Amsterdam Live Concerts 1953
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Amsterdam Live Concerts 1953

From R973.00
at 1 Shops
Amsterdam Live Concerts 1953

Write a Review

Think of Big Bill Broonzy as Leadbelly with sharper teeth. Like the seminal Texas strummer, Broonzy worked in the songster tradition, using guitar purely as accompaniment to his storytelling...
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Think of Big Bill Broonzy as Leadbelly with sharper teeth. Like the seminal Texas strummer, Broonzy worked in the songster tradition, using guitar purely as accompaniment to his storytelling rather than a means of virtuosic expression. But Broonzy's political lyrics--especially the famed color-line critique "Black, Brown, and White," with its warning "if you're black, get back"--are more direct. So are his onstage observations about racism and poverty in America in the two just-unveiled concerts on this two-disc set. As the liner notes explain, gin and the warmth of Broonzy's audience loosened the native Mississippian's lips on these nights. Nonetheless, his openhearted delivery of originals like "Just a Dream," later covered by his disciple Muddy Waters, and the standard repertoire of the early folk-blues era ("Midnight Special," Leroy Carr's "When the Sun Goes Down") is on the mark. An improvised stab at "Guitar Rag" and a "Happy Birthday" to a new acquaintance testify to the informality of these sets. They also lend breadth to a rare self-portrait of this highly influential bluesman as an inspired entertainer. <i>--Ted Drozdowski</i> <span class="h1"><strong>More Big Bill Broonzy</strong></span> <span class="tiny"></span> <i>The Young Big Bill Broonzy (1928-1935)</i> <i>Good Time Tonight</i> <i>Trouble in Mind</i>

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Features

Artist

Big Bill Broonzy

Format

cd

Label

Munich

Release Date

2006-09-12

Manufacturer

Munich

Think of Big Bill Broonzy as Leadbelly with sharper teeth. Like the seminal Texas strummer, Broonzy worked in the songster tradition, using guitar purely as accompaniment to his storytelling rather than a means of virtuosic expression. But Broonzy's political lyrics--especially the famed color-line critique "Black, Brown, and White," with its warning "if you're black, get back"--are more direct. So are his onstage observations about racism and poverty in America in the two just-unveiled concerts on this two-disc set. As the liner notes explain, gin and the warmth of Broonzy's audience loosened the native Mississippian's lips on these nights. Nonetheless, his openhearted delivery of originals like "Just a Dream," later covered by his disciple Muddy Waters, and the standard repertoire of the early folk-blues era ("Midnight Special," Leroy Carr's "When the Sun Goes Down") is on the mark. An improvised stab at "Guitar Rag" and a "Happy Birthday" to a new acquaintance testify to the informality of these sets. They also lend breadth to a rare self-portrait of this highly influential bluesman as an inspired entertainer. --Ted Drozdowski More Big Bill Broonzy The Young Big Bill Broonzy (1928-1935) Good Time Tonight Trouble in Mind
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Think of Big Bill Broonzy as Leadbelly with sharper teeth. Like the seminal Texas strummer, Broonzy worked in the songster tradition, using guitar purely as accompaniment to his storytelling rather than a means of virtuosic expression. But Broonzy's political lyrics--especially the famed color-line critique "Black, Brown, and White," with its warning "if you're black, get back"--are more direct. So are his onstage observations about racism and poverty in America in the two just-unveiled concerts on this two-disc set. As the liner notes explain, gin and the warmth of Broonzy's audience loosened the native Mississippian's lips on these nights. Nonetheless, his openhearted delivery of originals like "Just a Dream," later covered by his disciple Muddy Waters, and the standard repertoire of the early folk-blues era ("Midnight Special," Leroy Carr's "When the Sun Goes Down") is on the mark. An improvised stab at "Guitar Rag" and a "Happy Birthday" to a new acquaintance testify to the informality of these sets. They also lend breadth to a rare self-portrait of this highly influential bluesman as an inspired entertainer. --Ted Drozdowski More Big Bill Broonzy The Young Big Bill Broonzy (1928-1935) Good Time Tonight Trouble in Mind

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Pricing History


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