Art Without Death - Conversations On Russian Cosmism. E-flux Journal

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Art Without Death - Conversations On Russian Cosmism. E-flux Journal

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Art Without Death - Conversations On Russian Cosmism. E-flux Journal

According to the nineteenth-century teachings of Nikolai Fedorovlibrarian, religious philosopher, and progenitor of Russian cosmismour ethical obligation to use reason and knowledge to care for the sick extends to curing the dead of their terminal status. The dead must be brought back to life using ...
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Art Without Death - Conversations On Russian Cosmism. E-flux Journal
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According to the nineteenth-century teachings of Nikolai Fedorovlibrarian, religious philosopher, and progenitor of Russian cosmismour ethical obligation to use reason and knowledge to care for the sick extends to curing the dead of their terminal status. The dead must be brought back to life using means of advanced technologyresurrected not as souls in heaven, but in material form, in this world, with all their memories and knowledge. <br><br>Fedorovs call to redistribute vital forces is wildly imaginative in emancipatory ambition. Today, it might appear arcane in its mystical panpsychism or eccentric in its embrace of realities that exist only in science fiction or certain diabolical strains of Silicon Valley techno-utopian ideology. It can be difficult to grasp how it ended up influencing the thinking behind a generation of young revolutionary anarchists and Marxists who incorporated Fedorovs ideas under their own brand of biocosmism before the 1917 Russian Revolution, even giving rise to the origins of the Soviet space program. <br><br>This book of interviews and conversations with todays most compelling living and resurrected artists and thinkers seeks to address the relevance of Russian cosmism and biocosmism in light of its influence on the Russian artistic and political vanguard as well as on todays art-historical apparatuses, weird materialisms, extinction narratives, and historical and temporal politics. This unprecedented collection of exchanges on cosmism asks how such an encompassing and imaginative, unapologetically humanist and anthropocentric strain of thinking could have been so historically and politically influential, especially when placed alongside the politically inconsequentialbut in some sense equally encompassingapocalypticism of contemporary realist imaginaries. <br>Published in parallel with the eponymous exhibition at Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin.

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According to the nineteenth-century teachings of Nikolai Fedorovlibrarian, religious philosopher, and progenitor of Russian cosmismour ethical obligation to use reason and knowledge to care for the sick extends to curing the dead of their terminal status. The dead must be brought back to life using means of advanced technologyresurrected not as souls in heaven, but in material form, in this world, with all their memories and knowledge.

Fedorovs call to redistribute vital forces is wildly imaginative in emancipatory ambition. Today, it might appear arcane in its mystical panpsychism or eccentric in its embrace of realities that exist only in science fiction or certain diabolical strains of Silicon Valley techno-utopian ideology. It can be difficult to grasp how it ended up influencing the thinking behind a generation of young revolutionary anarchists and Marxists who incorporated Fedorovs ideas under their own brand of biocosmism before the 1917 Russian Revolution, even giving rise to the origins of the Soviet space program.

This book of interviews and conversations with todays most compelling living and resurrected artists and thinkers seeks to address the relevance of Russian cosmism and biocosmism in light of its influence on the Russian artistic and political vanguard as well as on todays art-historical apparatuses, weird materialisms, extinction narratives, and historical and temporal politics. This unprecedented collection of exchanges on cosmism asks how such an encompassing and imaginative, unapologetically humanist and anthropocentric strain of thinking could have been so historically and politically influential, especially when placed alongside the politically inconsequentialbut in some sense equally encompassingapocalypticism of contemporary realist imaginaries.
Published in parallel with the eponymous exhibition at Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin.
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According to the nineteenth-century teachings of Nikolai Fedorovlibrarian, religious philosopher, and progenitor of Russian cosmismour ethical obligation to use reason and knowledge to care for the sick extends to curing the dead of their terminal status. The dead must be brought back to life using means of advanced technologyresurrected not as souls in heaven, but in material form, in this world, with all their memories and knowledge.

Fedorovs call to redistribute vital forces is wildly imaginative in emancipatory ambition. Today, it might appear arcane in its mystical panpsychism or eccentric in its embrace of realities that exist only in science fiction or certain diabolical strains of Silicon Valley techno-utopian ideology. It can be difficult to grasp how it ended up influencing the thinking behind a generation of young revolutionary anarchists and Marxists who incorporated Fedorovs ideas under their own brand of biocosmism before the 1917 Russian Revolution, even giving rise to the origins of the Soviet space program.

This book of interviews and conversations with todays most compelling living and resurrected artists and thinkers seeks to address the relevance of Russian cosmism and biocosmism in light of its influence on the Russian artistic and political vanguard as well as on todays art-historical apparatuses, weird materialisms, extinction narratives, and historical and temporal politics. This unprecedented collection of exchanges on cosmism asks how such an encompassing and imaginative, unapologetically humanist and anthropocentric strain of thinking could have been so historically and politically influential, especially when placed alongside the politically inconsequentialbut in some sense equally encompassingapocalypticism of contemporary realist imaginaries.
Published in parallel with the eponymous exhibition at Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin.

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